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A trilogy of cybertronic audio adventures meanders towards a decline and we can’t help but object to the fate of two legendary Classic companions

After the traumatic events of The Reaping, Kathy Chambers has found a new drive, sailed through medical school, and flown down to Brisbane, Australia to escape the law and keep her nearly-catatonic nearly-cybertronic brother Nate in half-converted suspense, until she and her manipulative accomplice James Clarke can corral the xeno-knowhow to finish the procedure.

Unbeknownst to Kathy though, her new patient Tegan Jovanka shares with her a figure from her tragic past: the Doctor. Tegan’s been out of the game for 20 years; she gave it all up, kept her head down, moved to a quiet little suburb to feed her animals and grow her time-tumours, never so much as went on holiday. But now Doc has returned, just as Kathy wants to pick her brains…

Here's what we think of A032 The Gathering

We rate Doctor Who stories on a scale from 0.0 to 5.0. For context, very few are excellent enough to merit a 5.0 in our minds, and we'd take a 0.0 Doctor Who story over a lot of other, non-Whovian stuff out there.

Leon | @ponken

1.6

Drew | @drewbackwhen

1.7

Here's what we think of A032 The Gathering

We rate Doctor Who stories on a scale from 0.0 to 5.0. For context, very few are excellent enough to merit a 5.0 in our minds, and we'd take a 0.0 Doctor Who story over a lot of other, non-Whovian stuff out there.

Leon | @ponken

1.6

Drew | @drewbackwhen

1.7

Here's what you think 2 Responses to “A032 The Gathering”
  1. Peter Zunitch

    When thinking of how to describe this story, the term “jumbled” comes to mind. The intro recap is confusing. Unfortunately the best scene here is the moon, and it’s irrelevant to the story proper. There’s multiple scenes with characters coming and going so fast that one can’t keep track let alone care for them. Pacing issues abound. Many emotional moments are glossed over, while the exposition and filler moments drag. Even the soundscape is muddy. It’s just all…off.

    Much of the story hinges around the conflict Dr. Chambers goes through, and it’s written and/or perhaps a bit performed unsuccessfully. To be fair this conundrum is insanely difficult to pull, off but it doesn’t work.

    Next there’s the number thing. It’s a worse payoff than the opera house resolution in Battlestar Galactica. Way to tease a cool thing that turns out to be something totally irrelevant, and ultimately doesn’t even work for the trilogy.

    Finally there’s Tegan and the Doctor. This is sooo not how I want to see their reunion. A little friction is what they’re all about, but there’s absolute venom here and it’s just unwarranted. This is no School Reunion. Peter Davison however is the story’s one shining light. Despite being written (once again) as a passive character, he delivers some absolutely masterful moments. Poor Janet though is just given the wrong material to work with.

    This trilogy started in the future, and went retro. It seems the writing and direction did the same. 2.0

  2. Kieren Evans | @kjevans2

    So my half-thought thoughts are that this one is a bit weak, but oh well. I do think giving Tegan a brain tumour is a bit rubbish. Something that is less obvious now is that at the time this was the only Big Finish Janet Fielding did, but then she started doing them properly 2010 onwards.
    I really haven’t got anything else to say as it’s been a little while since I last listened to it.

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